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Princeton Public Schools Board of Education has appointed Matthew Bouldin as the district’s new business administrator and board secretary. Mr. Bouldin currently serves as business administrator for Hoboken Public Schools, which has six schools and a $78 million budget. 

Mr. Bouldin will oversee the business office, the facilities department, transportation and food services. 

The role of business administrator was previously held by Stephanie Kennedy, who retired after 21 years of working in the district. Thomas M. Venanzi currently serves as interim business administrator for PPS and will continue until August 27 when Mr. Bouldin begins.

“Matt is coming to us with extensive experience,” says Superintendent Steve Cochrane. “He has closed significant budget gaps, worked collaboratively on contract negotiations, and has provided oversight of federal grants, food service, transportation, and all aspects of the business office, from purchasing to payroll." 

"He has demonstrated his ability to find creative, cost-effective ways to support teaching and learning," adds Cochrane. "We look forward to his approach and perspective as we continue to provide an outstanding education in the face of growing enrollments and fiscal constraints.”

Mr. Bouldin has an economics degree from the State University of New York at Albany and an MBA from Rutgers Graduate School of Management. He is a CPA who began his career as an auditor with global accounting and investment firms. He has served as an assistant business administrator for both the Bayonne and Hillsborough Public School Districts. Bayonne has almost 10,000 students, 11 schools and an annual budget of approximately $150 million. A resident of Montgomery, Mr. Bouldin has two children.

Mr. Bouldin’s appointment at Princeton comes as the district implements the facilities upgrades associated with the recently approved $26.9 million bond referendum, as well as a budget that required the closing of a nearly $2 million gap between revenues and rising expenses. 

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