ENGLISH

The study of English each year is a requirement for every high school student in New Jersey. Students completing the Princeton High School English program will read from diverse literature. They will write frequently for different purposes, using a process approach, including revision and editing for grammatical conventions. Students will also continue to develop their vocabulary, speaking, listening, writing and viewing skills.

ENGLISH I: H14010

Grade: 9
5.0 Credits
Year
Prerequisite: None
Required of all freshmen.

This course lays the foundation for future course work at Princeton High School. English I introduces students to a variety of modes of expression and genres found in world literature. Major units include: autobiographical writings; story telling through myths, short stories and novels; dramatic, and journalistic and oral presentations of issues; the sounds and images of poetry and non-print media. Students write regularly using a process approach, learning how to vary their writing for different purposes. Vocabulary and grammar are integrated with the literature study and writing.

ENGLISH I PLUS: H14011 

Grade: 9
5.0 Credits
Year
Prerequisite: None
Course eligibility: Teacher recommendation, C+ or below in previous English course

English I Plus offers selected students additional support for the work of the English I class. The English I curriculum will be re-enforced with particular attention given to reading comprehension, vocabulary development, writing skills, home-work, and research projects. The purpose of the Plus class is to enable students to achieve their potential by providing opportunities for supervised completion of their assignments, assistance with skill development, and motivational activities to inspire commitment. Students will also benefit from guidance group activities, enrichment field trips, and advisory activities.

ENGLISH II: H14020

Grade: 10
5.0 Credits
Year
Prerequisite: English I
This course is required of all sophomores.

This course develops skills in interpretation, composition, oral presentation and discussion, vocabulary, and critical thinking. Readings include works by a wide variety of authors including Shakespeare, Remarque, Wiesel, and Fugard. Some of the readings and projects enhance the understanding of historical events such as the Holocaust. A process approach to writing incorporates the use of student and teacher responses, revision, and portfolio assessment.

ENGLISH II PLUS: H14021

Grade: 10
5.0 Credits
Year
Prerequisite: None
Course eligibility: Teacher recommendation, C+ or below in previous English course

English II Plus offers selected students additional support for the work of the English II class. The English II curriculum will be reenforced with particular attention given to reading comprehension, vocabulary development, writing skills, home-work, and research projects. The purpose of the Plus class is to enable students to achieve their potential by providing opportunities for supervised completion of their assignments, assistance with skill development, and motivational activities to inspire commitment. Students will also benefit from guidance group activities, enrichment field trips, and advisory activities.

ENGLISH III: H14030

Grade: 11
5.0 Credits
Year
Prerequisite: English II

Students of American Literature will read, discuss, analyze, and write about a range of American literary works (early to recent, fiction and non-fiction) in several genres (novels, plays, essays, autobiographies, poems, and short stories). Students will write in a variety of modes, including critical essays and personal narratives. Grammar and usage are taught as needed. Vocabulary study parallels class readings.

AP ENGLISH III: H14031

Grade: 11
5.0 Credits
Year
Prerequisite: B+ or better in English II

Students in this course will be expected to handle increasingly sophisticated materials and develop skills in the analysis and evaluation of literature. Students need patience with texts, time to do the many varied assignments, and dedication to individual growth as users of the art of language. Among the authors represented are Hawthorne, Miller, Emerson, Poe, Wharton, Fitzgerald, Hemingway, Thoreau and Whitman. Writing will be extensive and frequent.

ENGLISH IV: H14040

Grade: 12
5.0
Credits
Year
Prerequisite: English III or AP English III

English IV prepares students for college level courses through close reading, discussion, and writing related to works of literature such as Things Fall Apart, Oedipus the King, a Shakespearean play, the Arthurian legend, Romantic poetry, and various novels. The essential frame for the course is the cycle of the hero’s adventure. Beginning with a study of creation myths, students will examine the human quest to know one’s self and the world. By the end of the year, students will connect modern writings with this primal quest, thus readying themselves for their own journeys beyond high school. Emphasis is given to writing coherent, specific, and grammatical essays. Opportunity for creative and personal writing, including the college application essay, is also provided.

AP ENGLISH IV: H14041

Grade: 12
5.0 Credits
Year
Prerequisites: B+ or better in English III

Major emphasis is on British literature, although some choices in Continental literature are included. Supplementary reading, to be done in addition to the regular class assignments, allows for a broader range of choices. Students who take this course study the literature in depth and write analytical and expository essays. Close analysis of poetry is a major part of this course.

GREAT BOOKS: H12002

Grades: 10-12
2.5 Credits
Sem
Prerequisite: None

Great Books is a semester elective course in which students read a selected number of texts in both Eastern and Western literature and philosophy. The texts represent the best of humanity’s thinking and writing throughout the ages and are those texts which have had a profound influence on humankind. Although the texts represent a challenge, the rigor of the course will derive from the seminar discussion format. Questioning will be encouraged as the texts present ideas that have intrigued man throughout the centuries. Students will be expected to prepare for the class on a daily basis, write papers on the readings, and contribute to the discussion. Possible authors/texts include: Plato, Aristotle, Dante, Lucretius, Machiavelli, Montaigne, the TAO TE CHING, and the BHAGAVAD GITA.

MEDIA STUDIES: H12003

Grades: 9-12
2.5 Credits
Sem
Prerequisite: None

Media Studies is a theoretical and practical course which teaches students how to analyze and decode the complicated messages of mass media, including television, radio, magazines, advertisements, newspapers, and films. The goal of this course is not to teach students what to think, but rather how to think about the media. Emphasis is placed upon critical viewing and thinking skills, as well as the creation of student media products. Students will learn how to refute stereotypes and uncover embedded or biased messages related to race, gender, ethnicity, age, disability, and socio-economic levels. Students will review research studies on issues such as violence in the media and the blurring of news and entertainment. It is expected that students will participate in class discussions, projects, and hands-on activities. There is a strong emphasis on analytical writing in this course. Successful completion of this class fulfills 2.5 credits of the Visual, Performing, or Practical Arts requirement.

PHILOSOPHY: H12004

Grades: 10-12
2.5 Credits
Sem
Prerequisite: None

Immersing students in critical thought, this course will serve as an introduction to philosophy. The course begins with the foundation of philosophy, logic. Students will learn the elements of a logical argument, how to symbolize arguments to evaluate them objectively, and how to construct and use logical proofs. From there, students will engage with an overview of the critical pillars of both Eastern and Western philosophy, both through primary texts of philosophy and through critical reading of literature through a philosophic lens. By the end of the course, students will take a practical approach to philosophy, applying various schools of moral philosophy to real-world problems.

JOURNALISM I: An Introduction H12005

Grades: 9-12
2.5 Credits 
Sem
Prerequisite: None

Students in this course will learn to write and analyze the traditional core forms of journalism: news stories, feature stories, sports stories, the opinion column, and the editorial. While writing these forms, students will also study how codes of ethics and press law guide journalistic practice. Students will practice journalistic skills such as copyediting, interviewing, and meeting deadlines. The course relies on the daily newspaper and online publications, in addition to a class text, to inspire this introduction to the fundamentals of journalism. Successful completion of this class fulfills 2.5 credits of the Visual and Performing Arts requirement.

JOURNALISM II: H12006

Grades: 9-12
2.5 Credits
Sem
Prerequisite: Journalism I

This course will provide students with the opportunity to practice journalism skills by: researching articles through the internet; writing for publications for the various school venues through community outlets; having student writing critiqued by professional journalists; participating in video conferences; and interacting with professional journalists through e-mail or forums such as those provided by CNN. It is expected that students will use class time to complete course projects as well as to complete assignments for school publications. The format will be that of a workshop, and assignments will be individualized. Successful completion of this class fulfills 2.5 credits of the Visual and Performing Arts requirement.

WRITING WORKSHOP: H12008

Grades: 9-12
2.5 Credits
Sem
Prerequisite: None

A laboratory approach to writing gives students the time and freedom to explore many forms of writing and to experience all stages of composing. The class serves as an immediate audience and as a support group in a relaxed, productive setting. Emphasis is on the writer's own personal process of writing rather than on rigid forms. Requirements are a genuine interest in writing, a willingness to share writing with other students, and the keeping of a writer's journal. Because the writers decide on the forms studied within a semester, every semester is unique. Students may enroll for one or two semesters.

CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE: H12009

 Grades: 10-12
2.5 Credits
Sem
Prerequisite: None

In this class, students will read novels, drama, and poetry from the later part of the twentieth century in order to understand forces and influences which shape modern life. There will be an emphasis on American and international authors to enable students to examine the human condition. Contemporary concerns about the individual, family, race, and gender will provide a focal point. National issues surrounding diversity and culture will also be addressed.

MULTI MEDIA SPECIAL EFFECTS: H12011

Grades: 9-12
2.5 Credits
Sem
Prerequisite: None

In this class, students will explore unlimited creative possibilities for producing special effects. They will use software that efficiently produces motion graphics for film, video, multimedia, and the Web. The software will enable students to integrate with other editing tools to produce professional results. Successful completion of this class fulfills 2.5 credits of the Visual, Performing, or Practical Arts requirement.

FILM APPRECIATION: H12010

Grades: 10-12
2.5 Credits
Sem
Prerequisite: None

Students will be exposed to approximately ten films representing the history of film, domestic and foreign film, and a variety of genres. Films will be viewed in their entirety, and students will write papers in response to the films. Genres studied may include: silent comedy, the musical comedy, film noir, the adventure film, epic films, and mystery/suspense films. The course will focus both on directors and their achievements, and on great performances by individual actors and actresses. Students will learn the language of film analysis and read examples of film criticism. Successful completion of this class fulfills 2.5 credits of the Visual, Performing, or Practical Arts requirement.

VIDEO PRODUCTION I: H12012

Grades: 9-12
2.5 Credits
Sem
Prerequisite: None

This course introduces the student to the basics of video production including: camera operation, lighting, sound recording, crew positions, and editing. Students will work in teams and produce a variety of short projects aimed at developing style and proficiency. Shooting and editing will be done on digital systems both in the studio and “on location.” Completed projects will be eligible for review and acceptance to “Video PHS” for broadcast. Content issues will be explored, and technical skills will be developed. Successful completion of this class fulfills 2.5 credits of the Visual, Performing, or Practical Arts requirement.

VIDEO PRODUCTION II: H12013

Grades: 9-12
2.5 Credits
Sem
Prerequisite: Video Production I

This course allows students to expand and practice the skills learned in Video Production I. Students will be required to bring two projects to completion, beginning with written treatments and scripts through shooting scripts, technical production, and post-production. Documentary, news magazine, interview, avant-garde, sports journalism, and other styles may be explored. Students will critique and assist each other in completion of projects. Advanced techniques in directing, lighting, camera operation, and sound recording will be learned and applied. Shooting and editing will be done on digital systems both in the studio and “on location.” Completed projects will be eligible for review and acceptance to “Video PHS” for broadcast. Those wishing to prepare an admission portfolio for college or technical schools will be assisted and advised throughout this course. Successful completion of this class fulfills 2.5 credits of the Visual, Performing, or Practical Arts requirement.

FILMMAKING: H12015

Grades: 9-12
2.5 Credits
Sem
Prerequisite: None

Special attention will be paid in this course to learning the elements of shooting in the film style as well as translating literature into a visual medium. Students can produce either documentary or dramatic films, and both short subject and “Feature Length” will be possible. Film crew positions will be assigned as students assist each other with projects. Strict adherence will be paid to writing treatments, scripts and shooting scripts, directing talent for film, setting realistic shooting schedules, and the elements of budgeting a film. Completed projects will be eligible for review and acceptance to “Video PHS” for broadcast. Those wishing to prepare an admissions portfolio for college or technical schools will be assisted and advised throughout this course. Successful completion of this class fulfills 2.5 credits of the Visual, Performing, or Practical Arts requirement.

PUBLIC SPEAKING: H12016

Grade: 9-12
2.5 credits
Sem
Prerequisite: None

Students in Public Speaking will learn the basics of speaking formally and informally in front of a group. Initial experiences will provide students with brief opportunities to present themselves in front of a group. Throughout the course, emphasis on voice, tone, eye contact, delivery, projection, and use of note cards will prepare students for frequent and longer speaking experiences. The semester will culminate in formal speaking projects which will include debate, speaking on a panel, and formal speeches using research. Successful completion of this class fulfills 2.5 credits of the Visual & Performing Arts requirement.